Mixology Monday No. 82: Sours

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Once again it is time for Mixology Monday. I had missed the last several but it’s good to be back in the swing of things. This month’s theme, hosted by Andrea at the Ginhound Blog, is Sours. She’s allowing Daisies … Continue reading

Mixology Monday: Crass to Craft

After missing the last few Mixology Monday’s I am hoping to sneak this entry in under the wire. This months theme presented the perfect opportunity to enter. Here is the theme as written by Scott Diaz of Shake, Strain, Sip.
“The evolution of the cocktail has been a wondrous, and sometimes, frightful journey. From its humble beginning, to the “Dark Ages” of most of the later 20th century, to the now herald “Platinum Age” of the cocktail, master mixologists and enthusiasts alike have elevated its grandeur using the best skills, freshest ingredients and craft spirits & liqueurs available. But with all this focus on “craft” ingredients and classic tools & form, it seems we have become somewhat pretentious. The focus on bitter Italian amari, revived and lost ingredients such as Batavia Arrack or Creme de Violette, the snickering at a guest ordering a Cosmopolitan or a Midori Sour; has propelled us into the dark realm of snobbery. Many scratch bars and Speakeasies have gone as far as to remove all vodka and most flavored liqueurs from their shelves. Some even go as far as to post “rules” that may alienate most potential imbibers. Remember, the bar was created with pleasing one particular group in mind: the guest. As such, this month’s MxMo LXXI theme, From Crass to Craft, will focus on concocting a craft cocktail worthy of not only MxMo but any trendy bar, using dubious and otherwise shunned ingredients to sprout forth a craft cocktail that no one could deny is anything less. There are a plethora of spirits, liqueurs and non-alcoholic libations that are just waiting for someone to showcase that they too are worthy of being featured on our home and bar shelves. So grab that bottle of flavored vodka, Jagermeister, cranberry juice, soda, neon colored liqueur, sour mix or anything else deemed unworthy of a craft cocktail, and get mixin’!

My biweekly column on Serious Eats called Cocktail Overhaul goal is to take on dark age cocktails and re-imagine them. So for a change of pace I decided to go the ingredient route and dust off my old bottle of Midori to create a simple old fashioned.
Midorioldfashioned
Whats Old is New
2 oz Cognac VS
1/4 oz Midori
1tsp 2:1 Green Tea Simple Syrup
1 Dash of Aphrodite Bitters

Mixology Monday (Mxmo) LXVI: Bein’ Green

Mixology Monday, the online cocktail party, has returned for another installment. This months party is hosted by Wordsmithing Pantagruel and the theme is: (it’s not easy) Bein’ Green. Here is the description:

With the warm days of summer now fading off into the distance in our rear view mirrors, let’s pay one last tribute to the greens of summer before the frosts come and our outdoor herb gardens give up the ghost for the winter. For our theme for this month, I have chosen: (it’s not easy) “Bein’ Green.” (Perchance due in no small part to my predilection for Green Chartreuse.) I’m giving you a wide berth on this one, anything using a green ingredient is fair play. There’s not only the aforementioned Chartreuse; how about Absinthe Verte, aka the green fairy. Or Midori, that stuff is pretty damn green. Crème de menthe? Why not? Douglas Fir eau de vie? Bring it! Apple schnapps? Uh…well…it is green. I suppose if you want to try to convince me it makes something good you can have at it. But it doesn’t have to be the liquor. Limes are green. So is green tea. Don’t forget the herb garden: mint, basil, cilantro, you name it – all fair game. There’s also the veritable cornucopia from the farmers market: green apples, grapes, peppers, olives, celery, cucumbers…you get the idea. Like I said, wide berth. Base, mixer, and or garnish; if it’s green it’s good. Surprise me. Use at least one, but the more the merrier.

The field was literally open to anything. With this in mind I really wanted to make a Japanese Garden from Bar High Five in Tokyo: “a mix of single-malt Nikka 10-year Yoichi whisky (only available in Japan), Midori Melon Liqueur, Suntory Green Tea Liqueur, and a prototype green tea bitters of Hidetsugu’s own creation”.

Instead I turned my trusty bottle of Green Chartreuse for inspiration and came up with the:

Hazy Morning
1.5 oz Reposado Tequila
.75 lime juice
.5 oz pineapple gomme syrup
.25 Green Chartreuse
Mezcal Rinse
Combine all the ingredients except the Mezcal with ice, shake, and strain into a mescal rinsed cocktail glass.
Notes:
Mescal, Tequila, Pineapple and Green Chartreuse all in one cocktail glass create one big happy family. Rich and silky with a touch of smoke.

The next drink is from the Imbibe website. In reality the original recipe, Put the Lime in the Coconut is actually for shaved ice and not a cocktail. Now its time to add some rum.
Siren’s Song
1 Cup Coconut Cream (Coco Lopez)
.5 Cup Lime Juice
.5 Cup Rich Simple Syrup (2:1)
Zest of 1 Lime
Combine the coconut cream, lime juice, simple syrup and lime zest, stirring well. Overfill a small cup or dish with shaved ice and drizzle with the coconut-lime syrup. Garnish with lime zest and a lime wedge. For my boozy boozy variation add:
1.75oz Lemongrass Infused White Rum (Oronoco) per serving.

Notes: A refreshing treat that takes you back to the warm days of summer. The lime really cuts through and adds a bright and zesty flavor with the lemongrass adding its soft touches in the background.

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Mixology Monday – Equal Parts

So after a long hiatus Mixology Monday has returned. With a big thank you to Paul Clarke of Cocktail Chronicles for running it the past 6 years. Now the torch has been passed to Frederic Yarm of Cocktail Virgin Slut. The theme for this event, which is hosted by Frederic is as follows:

For this month, I have chosen the theme of equal part cocktails — those simple drinks where only one jigger is needed despite how many ingredients are added. These recipes have gained a lot of popularity as classics like the Negroni and Last Word have resurfaced, and variations of these equal part wonders have become abundant.

For me this is the holy grail of cocktails. We strive to create cocktails that are in perfect balance. But equal parts cocktails elevate that balance to another level.

One of my favorite cocktails that fits this criteria was the Fior di Sicily which I have written about previously. However, I wanted to offer something new for this months MxMo. After scouring around for a drink I stumbled upon the Calvados Sidecar on the Liquor.com website.

Calvados Sidecar
1 oz Calvados (Lairds 7 year Apple Brandy)
1 oz Cointreau
1 oz Lemon Juice
Combine equal parts cinnamon and sugar in a small saucer. Rub the rim of a cocktail glass with a lemon wedge and dip the top of the rim in the sugar mixture so that it is coated evenly. Place the glass into the freezer to let the rim harden. Combine all the ingredients in an iced cocktail shaker, shake, and strain into the prepared glass. Garnish with an orange twist.
Notes:
Looking at the picture I realized that I forgot the orange twist. Oh well things happen. As I didn’t have any Calvados in my house I subbed it with Apple Brandy. The cinnamon and sugar rim is essential and marries well with the Apple brandy, reminding you of cold apple pie.

Irish Whiskey is the forgotten base spirit and while not as cantankerous and moody as it’s brother Scotch, it does not find its way into many cocktails. So what better way to celebrate Irish Whiskey than in an Equal Parts Cocktail. While it maybe cliche I wanted to combine it with Guinness. I came up with a recipe that I think works and is quite simple. Yet as I was sipping on it I thought that it would be a wonderful candidate for a topping of cocktail foam. Does anyone have any ideas for what flavor the foam should be? If so reply in the comment section below.

Every Dog Has It’s Day
.75 oz Irish Whiskey
.75 oz Guinness Syrup (infused with orange peel and vanilla bean)
.75 oz Lemon Juice
Shake all ingredients with ice and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.
Notes:
In the creation of the beer syrup I loosely followed the directions provided by http://spiritsandcocktails.wordpress.com/2007/10/02/molecular-mixology-v-kentucky-monk/. In a future post I will explain how I created my Guinness Syrup version.

To see all the wonderful drinks created for this MxMo please click here.

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